Introduction

When organisations make production choices, they first determine what and how much inputs and expenses will be involved in a project. This is known as the cost-benefit analysis. These two elements have a significant role in determining the number of products and services available on the market, according to supply-side economics. When faced with this situation, a corporation must determine how many employees are necessary to generate a given amount of product and then provide those labourers to the market. In a similar vein, additional inputs like as raw materials, capital, and other equipment determine the amount of a product that is available on the market. These elements influence the amount of profit that a firm generates. With another way of saying it, the more the amount of inputs used, the greater the cost of manufacturing. It thus leads to a decrease in profit margins (Krugman & Wells, 2020). As a result, the manufacturing strategy should be designed to minimise input costs while yet generating the best feasible revenues.

Production Choices

Producing choices suggest the way producers would make judgments about the supply of products and services in the market. Numerous elements, including as market demand, competition, availability of replacements, costs, and so on, are taken into consideration while making production choices. The theory of the company investigates these principles in the context of economics and assists businesses in generating significant profits.

Implications of Product Choices

The principles may be grasped by looking at the economy of the United Kingdom. Despite the supply chain issue, the economy has lately been able to boost its gross domestic product (GDP). As a result of the pandemic impact, inputs raised the production costs of numerous sectors, reducing their earnings as a result. The availability of labour was the most significant constraint on supply, particularly in the health and industrial sectors. However, because of the rise in labour supply and other inputs, the supply of goods and services is expanding. Strategic decision-making is critical in operations and supply chain management because it allows for the management of high-risk choices. Product development, customers, production, suppliers, and logistics are just a few of the areas where strategic choices may be made.

Various Forms of Inputs

If you come across various forms of inputs for goods and services and how they are used to production choices, they may be classified as land, labour, and capital. Land, labour, and capital are the three main categories of inputs for goods and services. Land is really a location where production takes place, such as a factory, and as the cost of land grows over time, the cost of production will increase as well, based on which the choice of whether to expand production in that specific region will also be determined. It is the same situation as with the bland in terms of capital and labour as well as in terms of the bland A company will decide to execute and produce more products if the production costs are lower because the concept is similar and we are really very unique and simple, and this is because the profit margin will be much higher if the production costs are lower. Therefore, a particular company will decide to execute and produce more products because it is making a profit. Producing choices suggest the way producers would make judgments about the supply of products and services in the market (Young, 2021). Numerous elements, including as market demand, competition, availability of replacements, costs, and so on, are taken into consideration while making production choices. The theory of the company investigates these principles in the context of economics and assists businesses in generating significant profits.

Product Choice by Organizations

When organisations make production choices, they first determine what and how much inputs and expenses will be involved in a project. This is known as the cost-benefit analysis. These two elements have a significant role in determining the number of products and services available on the market, according to supply-side economics.

When faced with this situation, a corporation must determine how many employees are necessary to generate a given amount of product and then provide those labourers to the market. In a similar vein, additional inputs like as raw materials, capital, and other equipment determine the amount of a product that is available on the market. These elements influence the amount of profit that a firm generates. With another way of saying it, the more the amount of inputs used, the greater the cost of manufacturing. It thus leads to a decrease in profit margins (Financial Times, 2021). As a result, the manufacturing strategy should be designed to minimise input costs while yet generating the best feasible revenues.

United Kingdom Economy Analysis

The principles may be grasped by looking at the economy of the United Kingdom. Despite the supply chain issue, the economy has lately been able to boost its gross domestic product (GDP). As a result of the pandemic impact, inputs raised the production costs of numerous sectors, reducing their earnings as a result. The availability of labour was the most significant constraint on supply, particularly in the health and industrial sectors. However, because of the rise in labour supply and other inputs, the supply of goods and services is expanding. If we look at the United Kingdom over a 10-year period from 2010 to 2019, the liver is typically variable because there will be fluctuations in the number of employees employed, whereas the capital is typically fixed, and decisions will need to be made based on the labour because it is variable and the capital because it is not.

Although the price of the product is the most vital component, as stipulated by the Law of Supply, the price of manufacturing inputs also has an impact on the price of the product. The cheapest price at which a company can sell a thing without incurring a loss is the amount of money that it costs to manufacture the item in question. Making a product or service entails taking inputs and running them through a process to get an output. The completed product or service is the output, while the inputs are raw materials, labour, utilities, licencing fees, or even other items. In this case, the output is the finished good or service (Krugman & Wells, 2020). These inputs are referred to as factors of production in certain circles. Increasing the price of inputs results in an increase in the cost of manufacturing the item being produced (BBC, 2021). Consequently, at each pricing, manufacturers must sell their goods for a higher price to break even. A rise in the price of inputs, then, results in a reduction in the supply of those inputs. Additionally, a fall in the price of inputs results in an increase in the supply of inputs.

Use of Production Technology

Making a product entail taking in inputs, processing them via a process, and then delivering the finished product. Production technology, on the other hand, is engaged in the process aspect. Increases in the degree of manufacturing technology may improve the efficiency of the process in question. Consider the following scenario: you own and operate a small T-shirt screen printing company out of your house. Let us suppose you decide to invest in a workshop that is outfitted with the most up-to-date manufacturing technologies. This technological advancement makes the process more efficient, allowing you to expand the quantity of T-shirts available to customers. If you decide to go any farther in your expansion, some other technical advancements may be required. As a result, you will be able to provide more t-shirts since your labour expenses will be reduced even more. By automating the process, the dependence on human labour is reduced, allowing those resources to be allocated to other purposes.

Impact of Product Choices

It is not plainly important to consider the present situation; one's expectations might have an impact on how much of a product one is willing and able to sell in the future. Consider the following scenario: if your company manufactures mp3 players and you learn that Apple will soon release a new iPod with increased memory and battery life, you (and other manufacturers) may decide to rush out and sell your devices to retailers before the new iPod is released. The decision to boost manufacturing and sales now is based on what people EXPECT to happen in the future, and as a result, the existing supply of mp3 players is increased.

Producers (in general) have a direct impact on the quantity of a product they are willing and able to sell because of the number of new or existing producers entering the market. More competition often results in a decrease in supply, while less competition provides the producer with the potential to get a higher market share by having a larger supply.

Perfect Competition

It is a market circumstance where the number of sellers selling the homogeneous product that they are more near replacement for this product is more than the number of sellers selling the homogenous product that they are not closer substitute for this product (perfect competition). A consequence of this is that demand for items in a perfectly competitive market will be very elastic in terms of price, and there will be no barriers to entrance or exit for products in a perfectly competitive market. A perfectly competitive firm will simply accept the price determined by market forces because it is assumed that IT firms are priced in acres where they have no influence over the price. This assumption is based on the assumption that IT firms are priced in acres where they have no influence over the price. The premise that IT businesses are pricing acres that have no impact on the price means that there will be no selling expenses and both buyers and sellers will have complete awareness of the market's situation.

Impact of Highly Competitive Markets

Given that individuals would react to even a minor change in price because even a tiny change in price will lead to a huge change in the quantity required since there are more items available, in a completely competitive market, the supply elasticity is larger than in a non-competitive market. Therefore, the supply of products and services is more elastic in a completely competitive market, as is the demand for those commodities and services. Changing the prices of items and services even little will have a major influence on the quantity of goods and services available. For example, the tomato market in the United States, the railway wheat market in the United Kingdom, and the market for agricultural goods are all examples of completely competitive markets. It is possible to have a completely competitive market in which there are homogenous items offered by a substantial number of sellers, and a large number of close alternatives accessible for the products in question.

Impact on Supply

Consequently, supply is more elastic, and a minor change in the price of a commodity will result in a meaningful change in the amount of that product available. For competitive markets in the world, and for perfectly competitive markets in the world, the potato market in the United Kingdom is the most significant market in the world (Young, 2021). It is also the most important market in the world for perfectly competitive markets. It is estimated that agriculture accounts for around 59 percent of the country's land area, with agriculture employing 1.5 percent of the country's total labour force.

Impact on Farming Industry

Farming in the United Kingdom is a vitally important part of our economy, as well as providing most of our domestic food consumption. It generates over twenty-four billion in revenue and 8.5 billion in gross value added to the UK economy from 2010 to 2019, and their four agricultural economies are cons.

As a consequence of perfect competition, the most efficient allocation of economic resources is achieved. Because it serves as a standard against which alternative market arrangements can be measured, it obtains even more clout. Only a few industries, on the other hand, may be considered completely competitive. It's still frequently used, though, due to its usefulness. In an ideal competitive market, there are many buyers and sellers, homogenous products, minimal transaction costs, no entry and exit barriers, and perfect information about the price of a thing.

Purpose of Perfect Competition

A company's principal purpose in a competitive market is to maximise profits. The short-term economic profits of a company might be positive, negative, or zero, depending on the business's conditions. Economic advantages are only meaningful in the short term. Even if a company makes a negative economic profit, it should continue to operate as long as its pricing does not significantly exceed its average variable cost. As soon as the product's average variable cost falls below its selling price, the firm should be shut down.

Impact on Demand Curve

The demand curve for each of the small, independent businesses that participate in the market is fully elastic in a truly competitive market. Increasing prices won't have any effect on their sales since they are price takers. Customers would rather pay less for the same product from a rival provider. In the long run, the pursuit of economic profit is doomed to failure (Young, 2021). As more companies enter the market, the demand curve for each one moves downward, lowering the price, the average revenue, and the marginal revenue curves for that company to some degree. There will be minimal financial gain for the corporation in the long run. A position at which the horizontal demand curve and the average total cost curve meet will be when the demand curve achieves its lowest point.

As the price of an average product increases, the amount of that item sought decreases. This is shown by a downward-sloping market demand curve in a completely competitive market. Market prices are established by the junction of demand and supply in perfect competition. After the forces of supply and demand in the marketplace have determined the market price, individual firms become price takers. If a business does not charge the equilibrium price, buyers will be forced to shop elsewhere for a better deal, since all enterprises must charge the market equilibrium price (keep in mind the key conditions of perfect competition). To put it another way, the demand curve for a particular company is always equal to its current equilibrium price.

One company's demand curve is drastically different from the whole market's demand curve in a competitive market. The demand curve of a completely competitive firm is a horizontal line equal to the equilibrium price of the whole market, unlike the demand curve of the market, which slopes downward. In the case when the demand curve is horizontal, this suggests that there is a perfect elasticity of demand. Prices established by any firm that are even marginally over the market rate are doomed to failure. Businesses often undercut their competitors' prices in order to get a larger piece of the market. Businesses can't lower their product prices without suffering a loss in a highly competitive market. In contrast, if it is a profit-maximizing corporation, the company would offer its products at the market price.

Price Taker Corporations

A price taker is a corporation that is compelled to accept the market equilibrium price due of pressure from other competing companies. Increasing the price of a product by even one penny in a highly competitive market would result in the loss of all of its clients. It is necessary for a wheat farmer to go online or listen to the radio to find out what the current wheat price is. It is the dynamics of supply and demand that determine the market price, not any one farmer. Furthermore, in order to be able to increase or decrease production without having a substantial influence on the total amount offered and the price on the market, a fully competitive firm must be a minor player in the overall market (ONS, 2021).

In the real world, there would be no such thing as a "fully competitive market." When faced with a huge number of rivals offering items that are almost similar to their own, some organisations are compelled to engage in frequent price-taking behaviour. As an example, agricultural markets are often used.

Example of Small Organic Farms

An same result may be expected from a firm that is fiercely competitive and won't sell anything below the equilibrium price point. Why would they bother when they can sell as much as they want for a higher price? Additional examples of agricultural marketplaces that function in highly competitive markets are local roadside produce shops and small organic farms (Krugman & Wells, 2020). The term "price taker" refers to a business that is entirely competitive and so must accept the equilibrium price at which it sells its goods in order to stay in business. If a firm tries to charge even a little bit more than the present market price, it will be unable to create any sales.

Economists have developed models to describe the behaviour of different sorts of marketplaces. For starters, there must be a substantial number of similar providers and demanders for the same commodity, and buyers and sellers must be able to locate one another without incurring any costs. There must also be no obstacles preventing new suppliers from joining the market. There is no one who has the potential to influence pricing in a perfect competition. It is assumed by both parties that the market price will be met, and the market-clearing rate is the price at which there is neither surplus supply nor demand. Suppliers will continue to produce if they are able to sell the product for a price that exceeds the cost of manufacturing another one (the marginal cost of production). If the joy they gain from consuming outweighs the price they pay, they will continue to purchase goods and services (the marginal utility of consumption). If prices grow, more providers will be attracted to the market, increasing competition. Supply will continue to rise until a market-clearing price is achieved once again. Suppliers that are unable to meet their expenses will be forced to withdraw from the market if prices decline.

Conclusion

When calculating the supply curve, economists combine the quantities of goods providers are willing to produce at each price point into a single equation known as the supply curve. The greater the price, the more probable it is that suppliers will increase their production. Buyers, on the other hand, are more likely to acquire more of a thing when the price of the product is lower. The demand curve is the equation that expresses the quantities of goods that customers are willing to purchase at different prices at various times.

References

BBC, 2021. UK economic growth slows as supply problems hit the recovery. [online] BBC News. Available at: [Accessed 15 November 2021].

Financial Times, 2021. UK economic growth slows in third quarter despite September pick-up. [online] Ft.com. Available at: [Accessed 15 November 2021].

Krugman and Wells. 2020. Essentials of Economics. New York: Worth Publishers. Pages 355-451.

ONS, 2021. UK economy latest - Office for National Statistics. [online] Ons.gov.uk. Available at: [Accessed 15 November 2021].

Young, M. 2021 Lecture 6: Supply curve, inputs, and costs. MOD3327 Economics for Business. Anglia Ruskin University of London.

Young, M. 2021 Lecture 7: Perfect competition and market efficiency. MOD3327 Economics for Business. Anglia Ruskin University of London.

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